*Wimbledon.com uses cookies.Find out more
CONTINUE > We use simple text files called cookies, saved on your computer, to help us deliver the best experience for you. Click continue to acknowledge that you are happy to receive cookies from Wimbledon.com.

Paszek first into quarter-finals

Tamira Paszek gives a fist pump after taking a point from Caroline Wozniacki.
by Ron Atkin
Monday 2 July 2012

Tamira Paszek is on a grass-court roll and Austria, for the second straight year, has a quarter-finalist in the Ladies' Singles at The Championships.

The 21-year-old Paszek, who won the pre-Wimbledon tournament at Eastbourne, extended her grass-court streak to nine matches by comfortably defeating Italy's Roberta Vinci 6-2, 6-2 in 63 minutes on a windswept Court 12.

Paszek was Austria's representative in the last eight in 2011, too, and if she didn't love grass after last summer she is certainly enamoured by now. The daughter of a Tanzanian father and Chilean mother (whose surname she uses) Paszek arrived in Eastbourne having won only two singles matches this year and won that grass event by saving five match points in the final against Angelique Kerber.

Since then she has struck impressive form, none better than Monday’s resounding win against an opponent seeded 21st, who had advanced to the fourth round without dropping a set.

That state of affairs lasted just 27 minutes on a chilly day when the swirling wind made shot-making difficult. But it was Paszek who made light of the conditions from the outset, sweeping the first four games at a cost of just four points.

For Vinci, things started badly with a double fault on the opening point and steadily got worse. Two more errors left Paszek with three break points and she needed just the one, striking a forehand service return winner. Having held to love, the Austrian then broke Vinci when the Italian made a complete hash of a smash. Her judgment was also at fault when she left a passing shot which fell in court.

Belatedly, Vinci came to life, started to land a few shots inside the lines and got back to 4-2 with a backhand drop shot. But it turned out to be the briefest of rallies, as Paszek, encouraging herself with a bellowed "C'mon" at regular intervals broke for the third time in the set as another Vinci backhand floated well out of court and then held with ease, having impressed with the accuracy and depth of her shot-making despite the conditions.

She kept up the good work in the second set too, breaking to love in the third game and though Vinci regained that break immediately it was her last effort as Paszek accelerated away to capture the next four games and book herself a place in the last eight for the second straight year.

By the end poor Vinci was looking as woeful as her nation's football team after their hammering in the European Championships on Sunday night.


Back to news
Comments
Chinese