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Andy Murray - second round

Thursday 28 June 2012

A. MURRAY/I. Karlovic

7‑5, 6‑7, 6‑2, 7‑6

Q. Just the match you could try and get through, I guess, against a guy like that.
ANDY MURRAY: Yeah. Any match you just want to try to find a way to win. It's not always about how you play.
But today, yeah, I mean, you can't sort of judge necessarily how well you struck the ball or any stroke in particular. But you need to show good patience, mental strength. I think I did a good job of that today 'cause, you know, got off to a bad start of 40 Love down, and then I broke straightaway, straight back.
Then after losing that tight second set, to get that break at the beginning of the third set was important as well. So I did a good job.

Q. I think you said before that John Isner has the best serve in tennis. His must be up there.
ANDY MURRAY: Today his second serve, he was going for huge second serves. I've played him before. I don't remember him serving that big on his second serves. A lot of times he was in the high 120s on the second serve.
It's also a different match because he's coming in behind it as well; whereas Isner stays back. So you can get away with maybe just blocking the return in and getting yourself in the rally against Isner.
Against him, you need to look to do something with the return, because if it's just up here, he volleys well. He hit a few great volleys today.

Q. He thought he had been unfairly treated because of his foot faults. Were you aware he was getting annoyed?
ANDY MURRAY: There was a lot of foot faults in the match. Impossible for me to say whether they were foot faults or not. You can only look on the TV. And if he wasn't foot faulting then he has a right to be upset, because there was a lot of them. But if he was, then you can't do it. It's not allowed.
I can't really comment on it unless I see it. I don't know what they were saying on the TV. They must have had some pretty clear images of it.

Q. Can you elaborate a little bit on what it's like to have to play this guy where you get so few looks? Is it draining mentally?
ANDY MURRAY: I mean, it's sort of different. I mean, I guess it was a three hour match. It was fairly hot out there. When you play someone like Rafa there's a lot of long points, a lot of running in the rallies.
Today you have to be actually very explosive often, like on the return. It's like you need to be ready the whole match. Most times when I played against him, one game on the return during each set he strings a few shots together and makes it tough. He comes in, you know, a little bit, or he'll connect with a few forehand returns.
It's tough. You just need to try to concentrate really hard the whole match and not get too frustrated or too pumped because it can change very quickly.

Q. He cast aspersions on the integrity of the tournament. He said everyone wanted you to win, and he said that was responsible for him getting called for he said the 11 foot faults. What is your reaction to that particular aspect of what he said?
ANDY MURRAY: Well, I mean, that's very tough to question the integrity of Wimbledon, I would have thought. I mean, it's got a lot of history, a lot of tradition. There's been hundreds of thousands of matches played here over the years. I mean, I've never heard that before.
But I need to see the videos. If there was 11 foot faults called against him and every one was incorrect, then that's completely wrong and unfair. But for it to happen that many times, you would think there would have been a number of fairly obvious foot faults, because you don't really see them called that much nowadays. Very rare.
If it turns out that he wasn't foot faulting, if I was him, I'd be very, very disappointed.

Q. What you did on court, could you give us any kind of...
ANDY MURRAY: I don't want to go into it. Everyone is going to speculate as to many different things for what it is. It's something for me and the guys I work with. I don't know whether I'll continue doing it or not, but it's important to me just now.

Q. Just for Wimbledon?
ANDY MURRAY: Maybe not even in the next match. Who knows. I don't know.

Q. Gilles Simon has kicked off a bit of a debate about equal pay. He said all the men in the locker room agree with him that it's not right. Would you say that's true?
ANDY MURRAY: There's a lot of things the guys do agree on. For example, like at the French Open, Sara Errani, who made the final in singles and won the doubles, because it's not best of five sets for the women, it's much easier to play singles and doubles, so therefore more chance to make money that way, because there's very few of the singles guys that have a chance or a realistic shot of winning the event will be playing doubles here.
Same thing here. It's five set singles, five set doubles, so even less guys are going to play. There's things that we will agree on. It's not always just about equal pay, it's about the way the men's and women's tournaments differ, I guess.
But I think it was him and Stakhovsky. I think both of them have been elected to the Player Council and have been a little outspoken.

Q. The dynamics with Marcos, how do they change with his current coaching setup in your own mind?
ANDY MURRAY: They don't. When I played him last year in Tokyo it was a little bit weird having Miles there. I played him again in Brisbane and felt much more comfortable playing against him.
I mean, now I wouldn't have thought it would have any bearing on the match really.

Q. Have you any thoughts about David Beckham not being picked for Team GB football?
ANDY MURRAY: No. I mean, I have no idea who should be picked for the football team and who would be the best guys to give the team the best chance of winning. I think that's what it's about, not about who has the biggest name or whoever. It's about picking the best team to win the event.

Q. There was a report today in the States that one of the owners of one of the National Football League teams there was talking about possibly locating a franchise in London. I know you're a sportsman that likes other sports to watch. How do you think that would do?
ANDY MURRAY: Well, from what I heard, a few times they've come over and played a couple games here and it was absolutely packed from what I heard. I didn't go to the games.
I mean, yeah, if there's a demand for it, people are going to go and watch, then that's great. I wouldn't like to be the team playing from the UK having to do all the travel. It would be tough. It's like anything: I think if there's a demand for it, why not?

Q. Given the unusual way today's match had to be played because of his serve, is it almost going back to normality in terms of playing Marcos next?
ANDY MURRAY: I mean, I hope so. I mean, I just got to make sure and practice tomorrow, hit a lot of balls. Like I say, today it was very explosive. There was very few rallies. A lot of it is sort of reaction; whereas I'm sure there will be a lot more longer rallies against Marcos and there won't be periods in the match where I can't get into his service games or I'm not touching the ball.
It will be a different kind of match. I just need to make sure I hit enough balls tomorrow so I'm in a good rhythm for Saturday.

Q. Do you feel you've gotten better at playing against a guy like Karlovic?
ANDY MURRAY: I've had success against guys of that height and game style. I think I played him three times before and won each one. I've had a decent record against Isner. I normally haven't minded it too much.
It's just important to be patient against them. The more times you play against them you know more or less what to expect so you can be a little bit better prepared each time mentally.

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