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Andy Murray - third round

Saturday 30 June 2012

A. MURRAY/M. Baghdatis

7‑5, 3‑6, 7‑5, 6‑1

Q. One of your most memorable Wimbledon matches?

ANDY MURRAY: Yeah, it was. Yeah, it was tough obviously for both of us. You know, the conditions are tricky the first couple of sets. It was very windy.

Obviously the roof, I think the quality of tennis improved under the roof. I was under the impression I was stopping at 11:00 regardless of what the score was. Even if it was in the middle of a game.

But, yeah, obviously glad that I managed to get the finish. And, you know, the atmosphere at the end was excellent.

Q. Was it a bit off‑putting even during the first two sets not knowing when the roof was going to go on, knowing it was going to be at some point?

ANDY MURRAY: Again, it was the same for both of us, but it's not ‑‑ you know, we were never going to get the match finished, you know, unless it was 6‑2, 6‑2, 6‑2.

After the first set, which was fairly long, you kind of ‑‑ it's tough not to look ahead, but it's something you need to do. He started playing better at the end of the second.

I was making some more mistakes, but still had a lot of chances, as well. I had Love‑40 at 2‑All, and then got broken. Then had break back point and Love‑30s and wasn't getting them. So, yeah, the stop probably helped me.

Q. How distracting was the time issue as you got closer to 11:00?

ANDY MURRAY: I mean, I think if the set had been tighter I think it would have been distracting, but because the momentum was kind of with me, I just wanted to keep it going and play, you know, fairly quickly; whereas, I think, you know, for him it would have been better to, you know, to slow it down a little bit.

But, yeah, like I said, I was under the impression that 11:00 we were stopping regardless of what the score was, and I think I actually broke serve to go 5‑1 at that time, and then walked to the net because I thought we were going to have to come back on Monday.

Q. Did you really think they would make you play one game on Monday?

ANDY MURRAY: Yeah. I mean, I don't know what the ruling is. I don't know who decides when we can stop, but I thought it was an agreement they had with the public, and, you know, the people that live around here that they wouldn't play past 11:00.

So I didn't know if they were going to get fined or whatever. They said they'd speak to the Health and Safety to find out. But you never know. Even at 5‑1 the match still could have gone on. I was just lucky I finished it in a couple minutes.

Q. Did it seem like common sense prevailed in terms of playing those extra two minutes?

ANDY MURRAY: Yeah, I think, you know, with the roof there's always going to be, you know, some difficult situations for the tournament director or the referee. You know, because like today it was a perfect example. Do we start the match with the roof on so there's no delays, or, you know, yesterday I think they got criticized quite a lot because it didn't rain at all and the roof was shut the whole day, you know, when it shouldn't have been, because it's obviously meant to be an outdoor event.

There is going to be a lot of those situations cropping up, I think.

Q. What's your feeling about the last point, the idea of those saying it's supposed to be an outdoor event and they are playing too much matches under the roof and that changes tennis and therefore changes sort of the integrity of the tournament?

ANDY MURRAY: Well, I think yesterday was probably one that they might have made a mistake on. Apart from that, I think, you know, people want to see tennis. There is a lot of people involved, you know, sponsors, TVs, people all around the world who want to see tennis.

If it does rain, having the roof is a huge benefit because there is always guaranteed matches going on. Like you say, there are always going to be difficult situations, you know when you only have one court with the roof, because obviously for me now it's an advantage that I got the match finished.

Other years I would have had to play three sets on Monday. So, you know, for me it obviously helps. You know, Cilic played 17‑15 in the fifth set. I'm sure he would have rather I was having to play three sets on Monday before playing against him.

Q. Your mum and your gran are in the Royal Box today. A special moment for your family?

ANDY MURRAY: Yeah, I think so. I saw my mum beforehand. I don't normally see her at the tracks, so I think she's a little bit nervous about the outfit. But, yeah, I think they really, really enjoyed it, yeah.

Q. What do you think of her outfit?

ANDY MURRAY: I thought she looked nice. She's very slim right now. My whole family has been telling her she needs to put some weight on. I'll talk to her about that.

Q. Could you look ahead for us to the next match?

ANDY MURRAY: Yeah, obviously, I mean, you always kind of know what's going on around you, but, you know, when the scoreboard was coming up and it was like 14‑all, 15‑all, you know, there's a bit of ‑‑ you sort of thinking that's great for me, or for Marcos.

Yeah, I mean, guys can recover, though. It was a five‑hour match. When I played Novak in Australia our match was pretty much five hours, and then he played six hours against Rafa. So you can recover. The day definitely, definitely helps, but hopefully I'll be the fresher.

Q. You've had some high profile matches with him at Grand Slams. What do you remember from them?

ANDY MURRAY: Yeah. I played obviously the one in Australia. It may even have been the last time we played. Yeah, it was a tough match. He was coming into that one after a couple of long five setters, as well, and started the match really well.

So it will be important for me to try to get off to a good start in the match against him. If you are feeling a little bit tired and you go behind, it can be tough to come back.

Q. How are you feeling after falls?

ANDY MURRAY: Well, nothing I'm too worried about. Got obviously a few bumps and bruises. I fell quite a lot more than I normally do on the grass. I changed shoes. I put a new pair of shoes on when the break came with the roof and moved better after that.

Q. Was that because of the timing of the match, just late, gets a bit more slippery?

ANDY MURRAY: Yeah. Sometimes when it started to get very dark and when I have played late matches there before I have found it does get a little bit greasy. Sometimes under the roof, as well, it can do. It's quite humid in there.

Marcos fell a couple of times I think after the roof came on. So, yeah, it was tough to move at times.

Q. How much of the Nadal‑Rosol match did you watch? What were your thoughts on that?

ANDY MURRAY: When I came off the court I saw a couple of points at the end of the first set, and then I did all my press and went home.

Then I saw probably about five or six games in the fifth set.

Q. What impression did that leave? What was the reaction to seeing that?

ANDY MURRAY: Well, it's just a freak match, I think. I mean, the guy played unbelievable. He just hit absolute rockets. You know, then obviously today lost in straight sets to Kohlschreiber.

It's very tough. The way that he was playing, for it to be going in, there's no margin for error. He's hitting the ball so low over the net, so flat, so hard, that, yeah, it was always going to be tough to keep up.

Like today it was pretty breezy out there. You try playing that brand of tennis in the wind, it's tough. He played quite an amazing match.

Q. Roger said last night he said it's good for the sport that these upsets can still happen. Obviously the four of you have dominated at Grand Slams recently. Do you think the same?

ANDY MURRAY: To be honest, I mean, I don't know. I think, you know, a lot of people have said to me that the quality of matches at the end of the Grand Slams have been unbelievable the last few years.

You know, people like seeing that, but I think upsets are part of any sport. Some people like them; some people ‑‑ I'm sure Rafa, Rafa has a lot of fans that wouldn't have been too happy about it.

But it's just part of part of sports. They haven't happened that much over the last few years in slams, but they will start happening more. I don't think necessarily consistency from the top players can continue that much.

Q. Have you spoken with Rafa about the match or with other players about Rafa's match?

ANDY MURRAY: No, I haven't really spoken to any other players about it. I have spoken obviously to the guys I work with, you know, friends and stuff.

But, yeah, I haven't really spoken to ‑‑ I mean, normally during the day, you know, when there's matches on there are a lot of guys in the locker room discussing matches.

Because that match was finished in the evening, you know, and I wasn't playing the next day, I just came in and practiced and left. I didn't really speak to any of the players about it, but I'm sure everyone was very surprised.

Q. What will you do tomorrow?

ANDY MURRAY: Well, practice a little bit later, obviously a late finish. I will try and have a long lie‑in and make sure to see the physio a lot. Seeing as he's here, I can call him out. (Laughter.)

Yeah, well, make sure I'm in the best shape possible for Monday.

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