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Andy Murray - fourth round

Tuesday 3 July 2012

A. MURRAY/M. Cilic

7‑5, 6‑2, 6‑3

Q. How tough was that with the conditions and all the delays?

ANDY MURRAY: Yeah, it's tough. You know, I mean, obviously in matches you kind of can build momentum and build leads, and then when you stop, once you come back out again, you feel like you're starting off from square one.

But I did well today. He started the third set well. He had a few chances. I came up with some big serves. I served very well in the third set especially.

But, yeah, it's never easy. There were, what, three, four, three stops or something. It's not easy.

Q. Was the weather a factor in the pace that you played that third set?

ANDY MURRAY: No, not at all. Not at all. Because I served a lot of aces, that's why the games were quick. I managed to get done.

But, yeah, the weather had nothing to do. I would have played as fast or slow as I needed to do to win the match. I wasn't worried about the weather.

Q. Even if Ferrer is a clay court specialist, how much do you think...

ANDY MURRAY: He's a clay court specialist? No, he's not. To me he's not a clay court specialist. He won last week on grass, so he's won, what, eight matches in a row on the grass. He's been in the semifinals of Australia, I think semifinals of US Open, as well, and now he's starting to play better on grass.

I don't see him as a clay court specialist at all.

Q. How much do you think the grass helps his game, especially his first serve which is maybe not the best weapon?

ANDY MURRAY: Yeah, I mean, for most players it helps with the serve. You know, the one thing that a lot of players can struggle with is the movement. That's the one thing that's normally the hardest part on the grass if you're used to playing on other surfaces.

I saw a bit of his match with Roddick a few days ago. He seems like he's moving, you know, better than in the past. This year he's playing his best tennis I think of his career. I don't know if he would say the same thing, but from playing against him and watching, he's playing very well.

Q. The way you're serving at the moment, do you feel you could be in a better position against him knowing what he's going to be trying to do?

ANDY MURRAY: No, I think for both of us the return's probably one of the stronger part of our games. I mean, the speed of my first serve is probably a bit bigger than his.

But in all matches going on the grass courts, you want to try and win free points from your serve if possible.

If I serve like I did in the end of the second set and the third set today, I mean, it doesn't matter how well someone's returning. Because if you hit a serve close to the line on grass, you can't get there.

Q. You talk about the momentum being lost when you had to stop last night and come back today. What were your thoughts on the fact that no matches were moved to Centre Court last night?

ANDY MURRAY: I don't think it was my match. It wouldn't have made sense to move my match. I thought maybe the Mayer/Gasquet match to try and finish all the matches from the top half possibly.

But I don't know, you never know. I don't know in terms of when the matches ‑‑ obviously the match the other night when I played finished at 11:00. I don't know if there were concerns over that or not because they were pretty early on in their match when they finished yesterday.

But that would have been the only match that I thought might have made sense.

Q. Were you surprised when you found you were put on Court 1 originally? Did that bother you?

ANDY MURRAY: The schedule was done, I mean, almost like 15 minutes ‑‑ 15, 20 minutes after I came off against Marcos. I came out of the shower and I was told, You're playing second on Court 1. I mean, I had no idea what the weather was meant to be like or anything at that moment.

So wasn't surprised. But it was going to be tough for whoever had to play on the outside courts, because obviously the conditions were meant to be bad yesterday, today, and I think even tomorrow.

Q. Yesterday there was a prospect of you potentially playing three games in four days. Is that a disadvantage?

ANDY MURRAY: It's not just me. There's lots of guys in exactly the same position. Anyone will tell you if you play four matches in eight days, it's better than playing four matches in five or six days.

The more rest you can get the better, but it's part of playing Grand Slam tennis. Often it's happened to me in the past at the US Open where there's been like a backlog of matches. It's not going to be the only time it happens here either.

Q. Obviously not for Novak, because he's going to be playing under the roof if he is on Centre Court irrespective of the rain. Is that going to provide an advantage to a defending champion?

ANDY MURRAY: Well, we'll see whether or not it's an advantage for him or not. But the more rest you can get, the better. Anyone would tell you that.

Q. You've won a higher percentage of points on your second serve than anyone else in the tournament. Is that something you've been particularly happy with, and how important can that be?

ANDY MURRAY: Yes, it's important. I served well on first and second serve. Yeah, something I'll need to keep up 'cause, you know, the more points you're winning on your second serve, the more confident you are to go for big first serves.

So, yeah, I'll try and keep serving that way.

Q. After all these thousands of hours of practice, breakthroughs, setbacks, what would it mean for you to lift the trophy on Sunday?

ANDY MURRAY: I'm sure it would mean a lot. Yeah, I can't put into words or describe how it would feel because I haven't felt it before.

But, I mean, it's so far away. I'm sure, you know, you get that, I don't know, that feeling or what the sensations that you get are when it's close to winning a major.

But I'm not feeling that right now because I'm playing against the No. 5 player in the world in my next match, and I lost against him a few weeks ago at the French Open.

It's so far to think about it just now. I've thought about it in the past, but during this tournament it's not something I've been thinking about.

Q. It's not up to you to choose if you will play under the roof or not. It depends on God. But if you had to play Ferrer, and he has certain characteristics ‑ moving, the wind maybe bothers him or you more ‑ where would you prefer to play, under the roof, outside, normal weather? Do you have any sort of preference?

ANDY MURRAY: No, because, I mean, sometimes I played him when it's been windy and I played better than him; sometimes it's been windy and he's played better than me.

Sometimes we played indoors and he's played very well, and vice versa.

Yeah, it's not something ‑‑ well, I don't know. If I had to pick which courts to play him on, I'd rather not play him on a clay court because it's a surface that I struggled against him on.

But on the other surfaces I've played some good matches against him. Tough matches, but good. Won against him a few times. Hopefully I can do the same tomorrow.

Q. Following up about the action under the roof, what do you consider the biggest differences and what do you like and dislike the most about playing indoors here under the roof?

ANDY MURRAY: I mean, the other day when I played Baghdatis it was very, very windy. It was very tough conditions. You didn't feel that comfortable really going for your shots because the wind was, you know, affecting it a lot.

And then when you play under the roof, it's obviously, yeah, completely calm. It's probably easier to serve. When you're under the roof there's no sun or wind affecting your ball toss or anything.

But, yeah, playing indoor tennis is always like that. Yeah, it's easier conditions to strike the ball better.

Q. In terms of what you like and dislike most, what would you say?

ANDY MURRAY: I've always enjoyed playing indoors, but I never played that many matches on indoor grass courts. I hadn't play my best matches. When I had gone indoors I'd struggled a little bit here in the past when I had had to play under the roof.

But I played better against Baghdatis under the roof than I did than when it was open.

Q. The match you played against Ferrer at the French Open, do you think that has any relevance or not?

ANDY MURRAY: We'll see tomorrow whether it has relevance or not. Tennis changes on a weekly basis. Some guys play great one week and struggle the next.

You know, like last year I think Novak had never beaten Rafa in a final, and then he wins, whatever, six or seven in a row against him. You never know.

So I just need to make sure I play well tomorrow and see what the outcome is.

Q. Where do you stand on the argument whether you're the biggest hope the host nation has? Do you feel you should get preferential treatment in terms of scheduling?

ANDY MURRAY: I don't think you should get preferential treatment. You know, obviously, I mean, all of the players would say they would rather play on Centre because they know they're going to finish their match.

I don't deserve to play all my matches on Centre Court. Someone like Roger does.

It's not a bad thing playing on the outside court. It's just when the conditions are bad it's not ideal to be out there because matches can last for two, three days, and then you get a backlog.

But, I mean, I don't think just because you're from that country you should necessarily get preferential treatment, but I hope that I play my next few matches on Centre.

Q. You're a laid back person. How do you manage to keep up the tempo? How do you relax when those delays are taking place?

ANDY MURRAY: Yeah, it's not easy, because sometimes you come out and you feel a little bit nervous. Sometimes you come out and I think maybe it's sometimes better to be receiving serve. You can maybe have the game to get used to the conditions. There's a bit less pressure than when you come out serving.

Yeah, I mean, I listen to music in the break. This time yesterday I finished, went home, played on the PlayStation with one of my friends for an hour or so. You just try not to always be focusing on the match, because when you do, that sort of builds that tension. When you go out there, you can struggle.

This time I did a pretty good job in the rain delay because that hasn't always been the case.

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