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Andy Murray second round

Wednesday 26 June 2013

No.2 seed Andy Murray speaks to the media following his straight sets win over Yen-Hsun Lu.


Q. Would you like to talk us through your match today. How did it go?
ANDY MURRAY: I think it went pretty well. He started off pretty good, and then I think he had a few breakpoints at 2‑All maybe in the first set. Then when I saved them, I started to settle down a bit, and he made a few more mistakes.
But the third set was high quality. I was putting a lot of pressure on him, and he kept coming up with some good shots on breakpoints and stuff like that. So I did well to finish it in three sets.

Q. In the wake of the injury carnage today, how are you feeling? You're fine, aren't you?
ANDY MURRAY: That's sport. You never know. You can pick things up very easily. Obviously when you're playing, when you're practicing, then sometimes guys, you can fall down the stairs, trip over your shoelaces. Who knows. But I feel fine right now.

Q. Can you see any reason there were so many people with so many injuries today?
ANDY MURRAY: I mean, I don't know. I mean, sometimes it's coincidence. Sometimes it can be footwear. Sometimes, yeah, a bit of bad luck. Sometimes it can be court surface.
But I have no idea. I haven't seen all of the injuries that people have had. So I'm not sure.

Q. Have you ever known a day like it at a Grand Slam? Is it sometimes difficult to keep your own concentration or...
ANDY MURRAY: No, I think that's fine. All the players, you have to concentrate on yourself.
I think, you know, when a lot of players get injured, the one thing is you may be a little tentative yourself at the beginning of the matches, maybe not feel that comfortable, you know, throwing yourself around the court. But after the first few games, that normally goes away.

Q. With what's happened today, what may be happening with Roger, as well, one of your biggest battles here is about handling expectation. It's cranking up. Do you feel this might crank things up even earlier?
ANDY MURRAY: I don't know. I think that comes from your guys' end. I don't know what will be written. But I just have to take care of what's going on on my side of the court, practice well, prepare well for the matches, try and concentrate on each one at a time. I've done a good job of that the last few years.

Q. What was your experience of the court today? Was it the same as any other year?
ANDY MURRAY: Court 1 and Centre Court always play a little bit differently. But, yeah, the court, it's a little bit quicker Court 1 than Centre Court, and it's kind of a lot more open. There's a lot of space at the side of the court. But it didn't feel different to previous years.

Q. Do you look at how the draw may or may not be opening up or concentrate on the next game?
ANDY MURRAY: This is the thing. I mean, everybody was so obsessed with how the draw was before the tournament started. Now everybody wants to change their views on it because a few guys have lost.
There's top players still left in the tournament, and there's a lot of young guys as well coming through, guys like Gulbis, Janowicz. Those sort of players are starting to break through and play more consistently.
I'll just concentrate on my next match. I'm playing a tough player, a very experienced guy. Worry about that match.

Q. Having suffered with injury yourself recently, does the condition of the courts worry you at all?
ANDY MURRAY: I mean, I felt fine in my matches, to be honest. But, yeah, I mean, I think some of the players have maybe complained about the courts today. I'm not sure. But I think so.
But no one has said anything to me really in the locker rooms or anything about the courts being an issue. And I felt fine in my matches so far.

Q. Victoria Azarenka said on Court 1 was where she hurt herself. Did you find it any different today?
ANDY MURRAY: I just said, I didn't feel that way in my first match or today. The court felt fine to me.
But obviously a lot of players have been slipping. You know, I don't know what that's down to, like I said at the start. I don't know.

Q. You've played Robredo four times now. What sort of challenge does he pose for you?
ANDY MURRAY: Well, he's a tough player. He had a good win today against Mahut, who has been playing well on the grass. He's very, very experienced. He's extremely fit. He won three matches in a row at the French from two sets to love down. He fights right until the last point.
Yeah, I mean, when he's ‑‑ I mean, last year he had some injury problems. When he's not injured, he's been in the top 20 in the world for a number of years. He knows how to win tennis matches. So it's a tough match for me.

Q. You said you've done a good job of keeping the level head, and it has been noticeable. That's long experience, isn't it, that you've learned how to do that?
ANDY MURRAY: It's just having been around sport long enough. Upsets happen every single day. You can't take any matches for granted. People want to do that often and just write people through to finals or semifinals or whatever. But it doesn't work that way.
You need to be ready for every match. That's just the way that sport is.

Q. Do you think you've ever felt in better form going into the third round of a Grand Slam?
ANDY MURRAY: Yes, probably. It really doesn't matter, because again, every day's different. So, like I said, I played fine the first couple of matches. Just got to prepare properly for the next round. You know, if I do that, practice well, then I'll give myself a chance of winning.

Q. You said when you came off court you were being a bit tentative at the back of the court at the start of the match. What was that down to?
ANDY MURRAY: Yeah, I said at the start that that can happen, if there's a lot of people getting injured or whatever. I don't know exactly why they were. But you're going to be a little bit tentative out on the court. Maybe that's what it was just at the beginning.
After the first few games, I felt fine.

Q. How impressive is it to see somebody like Tommy, 470 in the world when he came back from injury last year, and now he's back in the top 30?
ANDY MURRAY: Yeah, well, he was there through injury. He wasn't there because he was losing tennis matches.
Again, that's what happens. In a one‑year ranking, if you miss seven or eight months of playing, your ranking is going to drop.
As soon as he got himself fit and healthy again, he's going to win matches on the challenger tour, for sure. Then it's just a matter of time when he starts playing matches against the top guys in the world, you know, until he starts feeling comfortable against them, then he'll start winning again.
Yeah, I mean, at his age, it's obviously a good effort to come back from a tough injury. But he's a top player.

Q. How does a match like this stick in your mind when you walk away from it?
ANDY MURRAY: I don't know. Some matches you remember more than others. I mean, I think when I was younger, I probably remembered matches a little bit more clearly. But yeah, now, I mean, if I went through every match I played last year, I wouldn't remember loads about a majority of them. There will be a few that stand out.

Q. Do you think sometimes there's more strength and depth in the men's game than we give it credit for? You were talking about the range of challenges that are out there even when some of the top guys go out.
ANDY MURRAY: I just think that the consistency of the top players over the last, I mean ‑‑ well, for Roger and Rafa it's been about 10 years, obviously Novak for four or five years ‑‑ the consistency has been something that tennis I don't think's really seen before. I don't think that was because of the depth of the men's game or there not being depth in the men's game. I just think the consistency of playing at a high level from the top players has been incredible.
But that is not going to last forever. When guys have slight dips in form, you know, some of the younger guys start to improve and raise their level, then that's going to be tough to maintain for a long period.
There's been a lot of depth in the men's game for a long time. I think it's just now the results are starting to show that.


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