*Wimbledon.com uses cookies.Find out more
CONTINUE > We use simple text files called cookies, saved on your computer, to help us deliver the best experience for you. Click continue to acknowledge that you are happy to receive cookies from Wimbledon.com.

Bernard Tomic - second round

Thursday 27 June 2013

 Bernard Tomic's press confernce after his 6‑3, 6‑4, 7‑5 defeat of James Blake.

Q.  Today you were clinical when it mattered in securing the breakpoints in each of the three sets.  How much did that please you?

BERNARD TOMIC:  Felt very good on court, very happy the way I played.  It was not easy playing a guy like James.  I had to focus from the start.  I was feeling really good on the court.

 

You know, can't complain.  Everything came off the racquet well.  I'm very happy with myself in the end.

 

 

 

Q.  Your serve was very consistent all the way through.  Must be pleased with that.

 

BERNARD TOMIC:  Yeah, I felt like I served 80% of the time pretty well.  It's tough to serve against James.  He puts you under pressure because he's going for all these big returns.  I managed to mix it up.  I think that's what made him, you know, get pretty erratic off his returns and miss a few at the right time when I needed it.

 

I felt like I served very well.

 

 

 

Q.  How are you finding the way the courts are playing so far?  Would you put those injuries down to the grass?  Is it difficult to play on?

 

BERNARD TOMIC:  Yeah, I think it's a question that's getting brought up now.  I fell over, as well, against Sam.  Felt like something was wrong there.  But I think it's due to a lot of the movement.  We're moving in the center of the court.  When we get dragged wide, I think the court is very slippery because it's still grain.  People don't realize that.

 

You know, we get used to our movements inside the square.  When we get taken out wide, the grass is green, very slippery.  I think maybe that's due to players falling down.

 

I fell twice already, and that was on the green grass when I've been taken out wide.  I think a lot of players have pulled out due to other injuries.  I can't really say it's the grass.  Who knows?

 

 

 

Q.  What is the talk in the locker room?  In Australia and the US Open people moved from grass to the hard court.  Do you think Wimbledon might go that way?

 

BERNARD TOMIC:  There's some talk now.  Why are a lot of these players pulling out?  It could be one of those things where it's just unlucky.

 

I mean, a lot of players are pulling out, so I don't think it's a coincidence.  Maybe it's not the grass.  I think a few players have already had injuries leading into this, so you can't I think blame the grass for the injuries.  Also a lot of players have fell down.  I know myself, I've fell down a few times.

 

It's difficult to tell whether it's the courts.  You know, it's grass, it's difficult to move on.

 

 

 

Q.  When you see Federer and Nadal go out so early, how do you strike a balance between this being a great opportunity for you and not letting the pressure get to you too much?

 

BERNARD TOMIC:  I think a lot of people were happy when Nadal sort of lost.  I think Roger was very happy.  I think he got ahead of himself, then things turned around.

 

The players that I think don't get too ahead of themselves, focus on their matches, have the best chance of winning.  That section of the draw, like you said, is very, very good, whoever is on that side, due to Federer losing and Nadal.  I would have loved to have been on that side, but unfortunately I have the tough one.

 

 

 

Q.  You said you would speak to the All England Club and ask them if they would have a rethink about your dad.  Have you had that conversation?  If so, what was the response?

 

BERNARD TOMIC:  Yeah, I don't think they'll be allowing him in, which is okay.  I'm focusing on my matches.  I'm still seeing my dad.  He's still advising me what to do.

 

Maybe in the next tournaments I'll see.  I'm going to keep my same routine, how it's going.  I'm enjoying how I'm playing.  I can't complain.

 

 

 

Q.  You're playing so well.  Do you need him?

 

BERNARD TOMIC:  No, my dad's still there.  You know, he's probably not here.  But as soon as I get back to the house, he tells me what I've done in the first round, what I need to do.  He's still helped me a lot.

 

He's my dad.  He's still my coach.  If I can pick up any advice from him, it's huge, because he knows my game the best.

 

I think that's why I'm doing well, because I am listening to my dad a little more the past few weeks.

 

 

 

Q.  What do you think before the match even started, a whole group of Australians singing?  Is that motivation?  What do you think about that whole scene?

 

BERNARD TOMIC:  It's very motivating to have the Fanatics there.  I know they came to support Lleyton here.  To see them show up at my matches is huge.  Amazing feeling.  Reminds me a lot of 2011.

 

If I can have these guys there the next match, it's huge, because they really get behind you.  That's what we need on court.  I need to have good support.  I'm very happy the Fanatics were there today.

 

 

 

Q.  Pulling out of the doubles yesterday, was that precaution?  Are you confident your leg's going to hold up?

 

BERNARD TOMIC:  No, I felt like I played a long match against Sam.  My right hamstring was starting to get very tight.  I spoke to the physios.  They decided the best thing would be to play, see how I feel.  It's difficult, because the doubles is best‑of‑five.  If I really want to go at it, it was difficult to stay out there for two, three hours when I had a match that was potential first or second today.

 

I had to feel how it was.  It wasn't 100% ready.  I had to get my body ready for today.

 

 

 

Q.  Did you just conclude that it would be pointless to make a formal appeal about your dad, or were there some communications?

 

BERNARD TOMIC:  Uhm, I think there's been some communications for sure.  But it's pointless now because they've stuck by the decision.  They're not going to change.

 

I'm okay with it.  I'm playing well.  I'm still involved with my dad when I get back.  He's still helping me.  I'm happy with the situation now.

 

Of course, I would have loved it to change before the tournament.  I'm not going to change my routine now.  You know, hopefully after that tournament, the next few tournaments, maybe there's a chance.

 

 

 

Q.  In the next round, if he continues as it's going, it would be Gasquet.  Can you describe that matchup.

 

BERNARD TOMIC:  Yeah, he's very difficult.  Also he's a player that I don't mind playing because I know I've lost to him the last two times I played him, but I feel like my game suits him pretty well.

 

The grass is a little bit different.  I played him on hard court twice.  Unfortunately lost 7‑6, 6‑2 both times.  But I feel on grass I can really get to him, not allow him to play his game, sort of.

 

 

 

Q.  Do you allow yourself to think back a couple of years as you've started to get into a bit of a roll here?

 

BERNARD TOMIC:  Yeah, for sure.  Brings back a lot of memories.  Each match, I think in 2011 when I played, I felt better and better.  I feel pretty well out on court today.  Hopefully when I step out on court against potentially Richard, I can feel good and play well.

 

 

 

Q.  You have a stat sheet in your hand.  How much do you pay attention to that?

 

BERNARD TOMIC:  Yeah, it's very important to know these little stats.  Little things can make a big difference.  Before maybe I wouldn't pay attention to stuff.  Now I'm trying to do whatever I can to improve my tennis.  Stats are very important because, you know, it shows you where you need to improve, where you won your most points.

 

It's good to look at these things because, you know, they can help you.  So far it looks okay.  Says I won.  Maybe the returns weren't as good.  It's okay, I guess (smiling).

 

 

 

Q.  Considering all the circumstances, could you at least understand why there's a reluctance about having your dad come on the grounds at tournaments?

 

BERNARD TOMIC:  Yeah, I think I understand the whole situation.  It's not something I want to continue talking about.  But at the end of the day, I'm still standing by what I said about the ATP.

 

Hopefully it can be resolved because, like I said, it's not easy playing in one of the biggest tournaments in tennis and not having your coach there.  Especially for me, my coach is my dad.  It's a difficult situation.

 

So, you know, I want him there a lot.  Unfortunately, I haven't been given the opportunity here.  So, you know, I'm going to keep my head down, hopefully things can turn around sooner or later.

 

 

 

 

 

 

B. TOMIC/J. Blake

­­

6‑3, 6‑4, 7‑5

 

An interview with:

 

BERNARD TOMIC

 

THE MODERATOR:  Questions, please.

 

Q.  Today you were clinical when it mattered in securing the breakpoints in each of the three sets.  How much did that please you?

BERNARD TOMIC:  Felt very good on court, very happy the way I played.  It was not easy playing a guy like James.  I had to focus from the start.  I was feeling really good on the court.

You know, can't complain.  Everything came off the racquet well.  I'm very happy with myself in the end.

 

Q.  Your serve was very consistent all the way through.  Must be pleased with that.

BERNARD TOMIC:  Yeah, I felt like I served 80% of the time pretty well.  It's tough to serve against James.  He puts you under pressure because he's going for all these big returns.  I managed to mix it up.  I think that's what made him, you know, get pretty erratic off his returns and miss a few at the right time when I needed it.

I felt like I served very well.

 

Q.  How are you finding the way the courts are playing so far?  Would you put those injuries down to the grass?  Is it difficult to play on?

BERNARD TOMIC:  Yeah, I think it's a question that's getting brought up now.  I fell over, as well, against Sam.  Felt like something was wrong there.  But I think it's due to a lot of the movement.  We're moving in the center of the court.  When we get dragged wide, I think the court is very slippery because it's still grain.  People don't realize that.

You know, we get used to our movements inside the square.  When we get taken out wide, the grass is green, very slippery.  I think maybe that's due to players falling down.

I fell twice already, and that was on the green grass when I've been taken out wide.  I think a lot of players have pulled out due to other injuries.  I can't really say it's the grass.  Who knows?

 

Q.  What is the talk in the locker room?  In Australia and the US Open people moved from grass to the hard court.  Do you think Wimbledon might go that way?

BERNARD TOMIC:  There's some talk now.  Why are a lot of these players pulling out?  It could be one of those things where it's just unlucky.

I mean, a lot of players are pulling out, so I don't think it's a coincidence.  Maybe it's not the grass.  I think a few players have already had injuries leading into this, so you can't I think blame the grass for the injuries.  Also a lot of players have fell down.  I know myself, I've fell down a few times.

It's difficult to tell whether it's the courts.  You know, it's grass, it's difficult to move on.

 

Q.  When you see Federer and Nadal go out so early, how do you strike a balance between this being a great opportunity for you and not letting the pressure get to you too much?

BERNARD TOMIC:  I think a lot of people were happy when Nadal sort of lost.  I think Roger was very happy.  I think he got ahead of himself, then things turned around.

The players that I think don't get too ahead of themselves, focus on their matches, have the best chance of winning.  That section of the draw, like you said, is very, very good, whoever is on that side, due to Federer losing and Nadal.  I would have loved to have been on that side, but unfortunately I have the tough one.

 

Q.  You said you would speak to the All England Club and ask them if they would have a rethink about your dad.  Have you had that conversation?  If so, what was the response?

BERNARD TOMIC:  Yeah, I don't think they'll be allowing him in, which is okay.  I'm focusing on my matches.  I'm still seeing my dad.  He's still advising me what to do.

Maybe in the next tournaments I'll see.  I'm going to keep my same routine, how it's going.  I'm enjoying how I'm playing.  I can't complain.

 

Q.  You're playing so well.  Do you need him?

BERNARD TOMIC:  No, my dad's still there.  You know, he's probably not here.  But as soon as I get back to the house, he tells me what I've done in the first round, what I need to do.  He's still helped me a lot.

He's my dad.  He's still my coach.  If I can pick up any advice from him, it's huge, because he knows my game the best.

I think that's why I'm doing well, because I am listening to my dad a little more the past few weeks.

 

Q.  What do you think before the match even started, a whole group of Australians singing?  Is that motivation?  What do you think about that whole scene?

BERNARD TOMIC:  It's very motivating to have the Fanatics there.  I know they came to support Lleyton here.  To see them show up at my matches is huge.  Amazing feeling.  Reminds me a lot of 2011.

If I can have these guys there the next match, it's huge, because they really get behind you.  That's what we need on court.  I need to have good support.  I'm very happy the Fanatics were there today.

 

Q.  Pulling out of the doubles yesterday, was that precaution?  Are you confident your leg's going to hold up?

BERNARD TOMIC:  No, I felt like I played a long match against Sam.  My right hamstring was starting to get very tight.  I spoke to the physios.  They decided the best thing would be to play, see how I feel.  It's difficult, because the doubles is best‑of‑five.  If I really want to go at it, it was difficult to stay out there for two, three hours when I had a match that was potential first or second today.

I had to feel how it was.  It wasn't 100% ready.  I had to get my body ready for today.

 

Q.  Did you just conclude that it would be pointless to make a formal appeal about your dad, or were there some communications?

BERNARD TOMIC:  Uhm, I think there's been some communications for sure.  But it's pointless now because they've stuck by the decision.  They're not going to change.

I'm okay with it.  I'm playing well.  I'm still involved with my dad when I get back.  He's still helping me.  I'm happy with the situation now.

Of course, I would have loved it to change before the tournament.  I'm not going to change my routine now.  You know, hopefully after that tournament, the next few tournaments, maybe there's a chance.

 

Q.  In the next round, if he continues as it's going, it would be Gasquet.  Can you describe that matchup.

BERNARD TOMIC:  Yeah, he's very difficult.  Also he's a player that I don't mind playing because I know I've lost to him the last two times I played him, but I feel like my game suits him pretty well.

The grass is a little bit different.  I played him on hard court twice.  Unfortunately lost 7‑6, 6‑2 both times.  But I feel on grass I can really get to him, not allow him to play his game, sort of.

 

Q.  Do you allow yourself to think back a couple of years as you've started to get into a bit of a roll here?

BERNARD TOMIC:  Yeah, for sure.  Brings back a lot of memories.  Each match, I think in 2011 when I played, I felt better and better.  I feel pretty well out on court today.  Hopefully when I step out on court against potentially Richard, I can feel good and play well.

 

Q.  You have a stat sheet in your hand.  How much do you pay attention to that?

BERNARD TOMIC:  Yeah, it's very important to know these little stats.  Little things can make a big difference.  Before maybe I wouldn't pay attention to stuff.  Now I'm trying to do whatever I can to improve my tennis.  Stats are very important because, you know, it shows you where you need to improve, where you won your most points.

It's good to look at these things because, you know, they can help you.  So far it looks okay.  Says I won.  Maybe the returns weren't as good.  It's okay, I guess (smiling).

 

Q.  Considering all the circumstances, could you at least understand why there's a reluctance about having your dad come on the grounds at tournaments?

BERNARD TOMIC:  Yeah, I think I understand the whole situation.  It's not something I want to continue talking about.  But at the end of the day, I'm still standing by what I said about the ATP.

Hopefully it can be resolved because, like I said, it's not easy playing in one of the biggest tournaments in tennis and not having your coach there.  Especially for me, my coach is my dad.  It's a difficult situation.

So, you know, I want him there a lot.  Unfortunately, I haven't been given the opportunity here.  So, you know, I'm going to keep my head down, hopefully things can turn around sooner or later.

 

 


Back to interviews
Chinese