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Grigor Dimitrov - second round

Friday 28 June 2013

Grigor Dimitrov's press conference after his 6-3, 6-7, 6-3, 4-6, 9-11 defeat to Grega Zemlja

Q.  Were you entirely happy with the state of the court?

GRIGOR DIMITROV:  Well, tough day today obviously.  The rain was pretty tough.  I mean, we were on and off the court.  It was a bit slippery again.

It was a great match, great five‑setter.  Got to give all the credit to my opponent today.

 Q.  There has been a lot of talk about the slippery courts.  You fell a lot of times.  Do you feel was it dangerous to play out there?

GRIGOR DIMITROV:  Hmm.  I think it was just a bit of a moisture.  I think it's just weather conditions.  I mean, I don't remember when I played here and you're sliding so much on the court obviously.

Well, I mean, it happens and I think you got to be ready.  It's the same for you and the opponent.  Well, it happens.

 Q.  You say it was the same for you and your opponent, but you were the one that was serving today, and you slipped at 30‑All.  Suddenly you had 10, 11 minutes to sit down and contemplate match points against you.  That must have been tough.

GRIGOR DIMITROV:  Yeah, it was indeed.  I think it started raining during the warmup.  I kind of thought the chairman would say something.  I was kind of waiting for that call, as well.

When I slipped, I fell down, I hit my hip.  I told him, I'm not serving.  Basically we had to, yeah, stop and wait for another chance.

 Q.  One of the arguments about the people who have fallen over is a lot of them haven't had a chance to get used to grass.  You played Queen's and Boodles.  How would you compare conditions here to those ones?

GRIGOR DIMITROV:  I think those were three different surfaces to me.

Queen's, I think the courts were great.  But, I mean, the weather was just drizzling all the time.  You could see the moisture was in the air.

Boodles was pretty low bounce, but you always be careful how you're gonna move on the court.

You know, then you come here, obviously you haven't played much on the match courts.  You play at Aorangi, it's a bit of a high bounce.  Next thing you know, you come out here, the grass is different.

In a way, that's kind of the fun part, getting ready just yourself.  It's a bit of a tricky, but I think it's a positive thing.

 Q.  Given the damp conditions, what are your views of how today should have been handled if at all differently from the way they were?

GRIGOR DIMITROV:  Well, I mean, first I thought we gonna play second match is the one thing that usually they always do.  Obviously today was a different day ‑ again.

I mean, there's not much I can say about it.  It was just one of these days that you got to go on court.

 Q.  How fit are you?  Will you play the doubles tonight?

GRIGOR DIMITROV:  Absolutely, yeah.  We're scheduled to play third on.

 Q.  So you're fit?

GRIGOR DIMITROV:  Yeah, yeah, yeah.  I'm fine.  I'm fine.

 Q.  There was a bit of a row at the beginning of the week between Maria Sharapova and Serena Williams.  Can you imagine why Serena Williams might have described you as the man with a black heart?

GRIGOR DIMITROV:  You guys tell me what kind of heart I have (smiling).

I mean, I am kind of here to talk about the slippery courts, how many injuries we had, pull‑outs.  I don't think we should be talking about that in general.  But I don't know.

I think that's in the past and that's getting old.

 Q.  This match, the way it worked out, might have been the kind of match, had you won it, would have been a big confidence boost for you.  How disappointing is it not to get through it?

GRIGOR DIMITROV:  Definitely disappointing.  I mean, I was looking for that match.  I thought I played pretty good in the first sets.  I had I believe 15 breakpoints in the fourth set.

Well, you know, it's kind of tough when you don't get one of these ones.

I mean, I think overall it was a good match.  I think I needed to play that match.  I mean, of course I'm disappointed.  I mean, I'm playing at Wimbledon.  I love playing at Wimbledon.  It's always a great feeling.  I love this court, in particular.  Good memories.

But, you know, things happen I guess for a reason.  But it's a good learning curve for me.  I'm going to, you know, step out strong for the upcoming weeks.  Hopefully the U.S. will be better.

 Q.  Asking again about sitting there for 10 minutes.  It's hard not to think about, When I come out, I've got to serve.  Were you thinking about the weather?  Were you thinking about coming out to serve?

GRIGOR DIMITROV:  No, I just didn't want to get injured.  That's the first thing that I thought.  When I fell, I really hurt my hip a little bit.

But, I mean, after a while, I felt like, Oh, it's all right.

It's always tough to think one thing in particular.  Obviously, you sit down, you aching a little bit, you got to serve to stay in the match.  It's not easy.

I think there's tons of thoughts coming into your head.  You kind of pick one by one, basically get on the service line again.

 Q.  Going back to the courts, you said it's the same for both players, for everyone.  A few players have come in here and suggested the courts perhaps aren't what they were in the past.  Is it something the players have talked amongst each other?

GRIGOR DIMITROV:  Yeah.  I think a lot of people in general, people are talking about, you know, the surface, of course the weather.  Who doesn't talk about the weather here?

Well, I think it's kind of tough sometimes I think for the aggressive movers.  I would say, I mean, I consider myself as a pretty aggressive mover on the court.  I think Tsonga, even the top players, I think it's tough for them when the grass is really slippery.

But, you know, I think you got to adjust.  That's the one thing.  I mean, you know it's not going to change much except the headlines.

 Q.  I'm sure you're glad when your girlfriend comes and sees you at the match.  Do you feel a bit more pressure when she's in the stands or not?

GRIGOR DIMITROV:  No, not at all, actually.  I feel even more pumped and happy that she's there for me.  I think that's what counts the most.

 Q.  Since you won the boy's title here, your name has been one of the names of the players that is going to potentially break through.  Does that actually put more pressure on you?

GRIGOR DIMITROV:  I think pressure's everywhere.  It's not only from that.  I think one of the toughest things you've got to face is your own expectations, obviously.

I mean, you'll be judged anyway, right?  So that doesn't really have to be, I mean, in your head in general.  I think the most important thing is really, you know, stay true to yourself, your team, really try to build up something, you know, through the years, and work.  You know one day if you do the right things, eventually things will happen for you whether, you know, going to be sooner or later.

So, you know, I believe in that thing quite a bit.  I'm not worried about any of the comparisons, the talks, the things between the rivalries, whatever things are being said.  You know, I think that's just a very important thing to me in how I'm going to deal with my own pressure.  It's my own business.

 

 


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